Scanning Archive

  • Today I am declaring war. I can see, that I got your attention! What am I declaring war on? DUST! I […]

    Fighting Dust

    Today I am declaring war. I can see, that I got your attention! What am I declaring war on? DUST! I […]

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  • Niklas Rühl posted a picture in our Facebook Group of a negative developed in Wineol, an alternate devolper that is […]

    Wineol – Red Wine developer

    Niklas Rühl posted a picture in our Facebook Group of a negative developed in Wineol, an alternate devolper that is […]

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  • 2 weeks ago I did a bit of spring cleaning in my Lightroom® catalog and thought about how I could […]

    Organizing your caffenol scans in Lightroom®

    2 weeks ago I did a bit of spring cleaning in my Lightroom® catalog and thought about how I could […]

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  • This is an article of fine art figure photographer Scott Nichol from Allentown, PA, USA. You can visit his blog at http://www.silverystars.com/somanystars/. The Original article […]

    Fomapan 400 in Caffenol-STD – Experiments and Results. And Large Format

    This is an article of fine art figure photographer Scott Nichol from Allentown, PA, USA. You can visit his blog at http://www.silverystars.com/somanystars/. The Original article […]

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  • It’s been a long time since there was an article here on caffenol.org and I know that some of you […]

    Caffenol for paper prints

    It’s been a long time since there was an article here on caffenol.org and I know that some of you […]

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  • Caffenol-C in all variants makes a wonderful developer for negative film and if used carefully, it can be used for […]

    Caffenol as paper developer

    Caffenol-C in all variants makes a wonderful developer for negative film and if used carefully, it can be used for […]

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  • f you read a bit about caffenol development or development in general, you will quickly learn phrases like "my negatives came out very dense" or "negatives where thin, but scanned fine". So what does all that mean?

If you develop color films in caffenol, most likely you will get dense negatives (dense meaning you cannot see through the film in this case), positive films and High ISO films will be denser then low ISO films. These negatives are not very good to produce prints on paper, as contrast is quite low and they have an orange mask. High ISO B&W Films will most likely come out very thin and will look like underdeveloped negatives. Both types will scan fine and with a small amount of Post Processing (Level adjustments) they will look good on a screen.

    Density

    f you read a bit about caffenol development or development in general, you will quickly learn phrases like "my negatives came out very dense" or "negatives where thin, but scanned fine". So what does all that mean? If you develop color films in caffenol, most likely you will get dense negatives (dense meaning you cannot see through the film in this case), positive films and High ISO films will be denser then low ISO films. These negatives are not very good to produce prints on paper, as contrast is quite low and they have an orange mask. High ISO B&W Films will most likely come out very thin and will look like underdeveloped negatives. Both types will scan fine and with a small amount of Post Processing (Level adjustments) they will look good on a screen.

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  • I have a fair amount of Kodak Professional Portra 160 NC (Neutral Color) but never tried it out. Having still […]

    Neutral Color in B&W

    I have a fair amount of Kodak Professional Portra 160 NC (Neutral Color) but never tried it out. Having still […]

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  • <!--:en-->Well, you can develop every kind of film in Caffenol (a B&W process, that is) as long as it contains silver. So why not push that to the extreme and use an expired ISO 1600 Film and develop it in Caffenol.<!--:--><!--:de-->Well, you can develop every kind of film in Caffenol (a B&W process, that is) as long as it contains silver. So why not push that to the extreme and use an expired ISO 1600 Film and develop it in Caffenol.<!--:-->

    Hold on. Color film?

    Well, you can develop every kind of film in Caffenol (a B&W process, that is) as long as it contains silver. So why not push that to the extreme and use an expired ISO 1600 Film and develop it in Caffenol.Well, you can develop every kind of film in Caffenol (a B&W process, that is) as long as it contains silver. So why not push that to the extreme and use an expired ISO 1600 Film and develop it in Caffenol.

    Continue Reading...