caffenol Archive

  • It’s been a busy year for caffenol, and 2011 will not calm down, that’s for sure. I would like to […]

    Happy New Year!

    It’s been a busy year for caffenol, and 2011 will not calm down, that’s for sure. I would like to […]

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  • Caffenol-C in all variants makes a wonderful developer for negative film and if used carefully, it can be used for […]

    Caffenol as paper developer

    Caffenol-C in all variants makes a wonderful developer for negative film and if used carefully, it can be used for […]

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  • If you are new to film developing, or just new to caffenol developing you can find plenty of ressources on […]

    caffenomatography

    If you are new to film developing, or just new to caffenol developing you can find plenty of ressources on […]

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  • I cleaned up my camera cabinet yesterday and stumbled upon my Action sampler camera where I remembered I shot some film with […]

    Action!

    I cleaned up my camera cabinet yesterday and stumbled upon my Action sampler camera where I remembered I shot some film with […]

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  • Yes, the title of this post looks confusing, because of course scanning is an input process and printing is an […]

    Scan VS print

    Yes, the title of this post looks confusing, because of course scanning is an input process and printing is an […]

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  • f you read a bit about caffenol development or development in general, you will quickly learn phrases like "my negatives came out very dense" or "negatives where thin, but scanned fine". So what does all that mean?

If you develop color films in caffenol, most likely you will get dense negatives (dense meaning you cannot see through the film in this case), positive films and High ISO films will be denser then low ISO films. These negatives are not very good to produce prints on paper, as contrast is quite low and they have an orange mask. High ISO B&W Films will most likely come out very thin and will look like underdeveloped negatives. Both types will scan fine and with a small amount of Post Processing (Level adjustments) they will look good on a screen.

    Density

    f you read a bit about caffenol development or development in general, you will quickly learn phrases like "my negatives came out very dense" or "negatives where thin, but scanned fine". So what does all that mean? If you develop color films in caffenol, most likely you will get dense negatives (dense meaning you cannot see through the film in this case), positive films and High ISO films will be denser then low ISO films. These negatives are not very good to produce prints on paper, as contrast is quite low and they have an orange mask. High ISO B&W Films will most likely come out very thin and will look like underdeveloped negatives. Both types will scan fine and with a small amount of Post Processing (Level adjustments) they will look good on a screen.

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  • <!--:en-->A friend of mine recently told me about Diafine, a quite famous dual solution developer that is said to push mid tones by 1 stop. Diafine is a compensating developer, meaning you put in Solution A, let the film rest for 4 minutes with maybe 1 slow agitation per minute, pour out Solution A (both solutions can be reused) and then put in Solution B and let it develop further 4 minutes with agitation that is specific to the used film.

I was amazed about the tonality that the developer brings, and because I like experimenting, I thought why not try out something like that with Caffenol. Of course I knew that it will most probably not push the mids, and I cannot reuse the Caffenol mix, but it was fun for the experiment.<!--:--><!--:de-->A friend of mine recently told me about Diafine, a quite famous dual solution developer that is said to push mid tones by 1 stop. Diafine is a compensating developer, meaning you put in Solution A, let the film rest for 4 minutes with maybe 1 slow agitation per minute, pour out Solution A (both solutions can be reused) and then put in Solution B and let it develop further 4 minutes with agitation that is specific to the used film.

I was amazed about the tonality that the developer brings, and because I like experimenting, I thought why not try out something like that with Caffenol. Of course I knew that it will most probably not push the mids, and I cannot reuse the Caffenol mix, but it was fun for the experiment.<!--:-->

    Caffeafine (Using Caffenol-C as 2 step developer)

    A friend of mine recently told me about Diafine, a quite famous dual solution developer that is said to push mid tones by 1 stop. Diafine is a compensating developer, meaning you put in Solution A, let the film rest for 4 minutes with maybe 1 slow agitation per minute, pour out Solution A (both solutions can be reused) and then put in Solution B and let it develop further 4 minutes with agitation that is specific to the used film. I was amazed about the tonality that the developer brings, and because I like experimenting, I thought why not try out something like that with Caffenol. Of course I knew that it will most probably not push the mids, and I cannot reuse the Caffenol mix, but it was fun for the experiment.A friend of mine recently told me about Diafine, a quite famous dual solution developer that is said to push mid tones by 1 stop. Diafine is a compensating developer, meaning you put in Solution A, let the film rest for 4 minutes with maybe 1 slow agitation per minute, pour out Solution A (both solutions can be reused) and then put in Solution B and let it develop further 4 minutes with agitation that is specific to the used film. I was amazed about the tonality that the developer brings, and because I like experimenting, I thought why not try out something like that with Caffenol. Of course I knew that it will most probably not push the mids, and I cannot reuse the Caffenol mix, but it was fun for the experiment.

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  • Some may be surprised that it took me so long to try out Kodak TMAX 400 in caffenol, but that's how I am, always wanting to try out something new, something different. A friend of mine gave me a roll of TMAX 400 because he said he really likes it. It's a Tabular-grain-film like the Delta films from Ilford where the silver halide crystals are more flat and tabular.
Kodak says it is the sharpest, fined grained ISO 400 film and it pushes up to EI 1600. So why not taking it to the Construction of the Oktoberfest in Munich and shoot at dusk with a slow Lens, a Tamron 28-80 f3.5-5.6
Developed in the Delta recipe with doubled amount of Vitamin-C

    Kodak T-MAX – from T-Grain to Coffee granules

    Some may be surprised that it took me so long to try out Kodak TMAX 400 in caffenol, but that's how I am, always wanting to try out something new, something different. A friend of mine gave me a roll of TMAX 400 because he said he really likes it. It's a Tabular-grain-film like the Delta films from Ilford where the silver halide crystals are more flat and tabular. Kodak says it is the sharpest, fined grained ISO 400 film and it pushes up to EI 1600. So why not taking it to the Construction of the Oktoberfest in Munich and shoot at dusk with a slow Lens, a Tamron 28-80 f3.5-5.6 Developed in the Delta recipe with doubled amount of Vitamin-C

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  • Small, black, fast. This is how you can describe the Revue 35CC. The camera was also sold as Chinon Bellami […]

    The Espresso Camera

    Small, black, fast. This is how you can describe the Revue 35CC. The camera was also sold as Chinon Bellami […]

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  • I just love going on a flea market and buying any camera that the owner is willing to give away for under 5 EURO. Just like this wonderful Smena Symbol. A plastic camera from Russia, made in the LOMO factory. It features a 40mm f4 lens and weather symbols as additional shutter speed scale. The lens has a stepless aperture, which doubles as ISO setting. You can read more about this camera on Camerapdia.

    Smena Symbol – The other LOMO

    I just love going on a flea market and buying any camera that the owner is willing to give away for under 5 EURO. Just like this wonderful Smena Symbol. A plastic camera from Russia, made in the LOMO factory. It features a 40mm f4 lens and weather symbols as additional shutter speed scale. The lens has a stepless aperture, which doubles as ISO setting. You can read more about this camera on Camerapdia.

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